Quaking Fire

The two fires being managed to achieve resource objectives near Tusayan, Ariz., remain active while the other managed fires on the Kaibab National Forest and the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park have slowed substantially or petered out due to rain. Much of northern Arizona has received substantial precipitation over the last few days, putting a damper on the naturally-ignited fires that were being managed to improve forest health and reduce the likelihood of future high-severity fires.

The fires being managed for resource benefit on the Kaibab National Forest and the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park are growing slowly but steadily as weather conditions vary on a daily basis. Yesterday, the fires received varying amounts of precipitation, from a heavy downpour on the Sitgreaves Complex to more light and scattered rainfall on the fires further north.

The fires being managed for resource benefit on the Kaibab National Forest and the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park increased in activity yesterday due to drier conditions. Fire managers are hopeful that the drier weather pattern will allow the fires to continue growing and achieving resource objectives such as improving forest health and reducing the likelihood of future high-severity fires.

Widespread rain has temporarily stalled the growth of the four lightning-caused fires that are being managed to improve forest health on the Kaibab National Forest and on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon National Park.

Fire managers expect that the four fires, which have been burning since earlier this month, will continue growing and benefiting the ecosystem as drier conditions return to northern Arizona over the next few days.

With the return of monsoonal precipitation to all fires, growth and activity have slowed. Crews continue to monitor the fires and complete preparation work ahead of drier conditions forecasted to return mid-week.

Smoke will be much lighter today and tonight. Fire managers continue to coordinate with neighboring forests, national parks, municipal fire departments, and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality to monitor smoke impacts.

With the return of monsoonal precipitation to all fires, growth and activity have slowed. Crews continue to monitor the fires and do preparation work ahead of drier conditions forecasted to return mid-week. Smoke will be much lighter today and tonight. Fire managers continue to coordinate with neighboring forests, national parks, municipal fire departments, and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality to monitor smoke impacts.

Growth continued yesterday on all fires being managed for resource benefits with multiple objectives. Today crews continue to do preparation work ahead of managed ignitions and ignitions may occur on some fires. Fire managers continue to coordinate with neighboring forests, national parks, municipal fire departments, and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality to monitor smoke impacts. For more information on smoke and air quality please visit www.azdeq.gov or www.wildlandfire.az.gov.

Yesterday, monsoonal winds pushed smoke into the Flagstaff, Sedona, and Verde Valley areas from the Sitgreaves Complex on the Kaibab National Forest near Parks, Ariz. With variable winds in the forecast, smoke is likely to drift toward these areas again for the next several days. Fire managers continue to coordinate with neighboring forests, national parks, municipal fire departments, and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality to monitor smoke impacts.

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