public health

Coconino County Public Health Services District (CCPHSD) officials confirmed that fleas collected in the Doney Park area, northeast of Flagstaff, have tested positive for plague (Yersinia pestis). Last week fleas collected in the Red Lake area, approximately five miles northeast of Williams, tested positive for plague. The tests were conducted by the Center for Pathogen and Microbiome Institute at Northern Arizona University.

As work continues on the International Outfall Interceptor (IOI) and the Nogales Wash, Santa Cruz County Health Services continues to remind the public to stay out of the Nogales Wash and Santa Cruz River due to continued health concerns and water quality. Health Officials continue to recommend to those who live within the county, along the Santa Cruz River, and have a private well within 100 ft. of the waterway have their wells tested for contamination.
 

Coconino County Public Health Services District (CCPHSD) officials confirmed that fleas collected in the Red Lake area, approximately five miles northeast of Williams, tested positive for plague (Yersinia pestis). The tests were conducted by the Center for Pathogen and Microbiome Institute at Northern Arizona University. 

CCPHSD is notifying area residents. The burrows are being treated and the area will be closely monitored to determine if further action is required. 

As July comes to a close, we would like you to know that August has been proclaimed “Drowning Impact Awareness Month” in the City of Yuma by Mayor Douglas J. Nicholls. This proclamation was also being made for the State of Arizona by Gov. Douglas A. Ducey.  The purpose is to raise awareness of the number of cases and the impact of child drowning in Arizona. Even though Arizona is considered a desert state, on average, drowning incidents take the lives of many of our state’s children. Children 4 years old and younger are in the highest risk group.

Representative from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are on site at this time to assist in the development of a plan to divert the flow of water in the area of the partial breach of the International Outfall Interceptor (IOI).
 
Site surveys are being conducted along the IOI to assess any change to the current conditions of the wash after last night’s storms. It is asked that the public refrain from entering this area to allow agencies representatives to conduct their surveys and for the safety of the employees working in the area.
 

This week, during routine mosquito surveillance, the Pinal County Public Health Services District (PCPHSD) detected the first West Nile Virus (WNV) positive mosquitoes in the county this season, more specifically in the San Tan Valley area.  Mosquito surveillance data is used to help determine the risk of mosquito borne disease to Pinal County residents and visitors and it guides PCPHSD's disease prevention efforts.

Santa Cruz County Public Work personnel monitored the partial breach of the International Outfall Interceptor, (IOI) late yesterday and early this morning and have reported no significant change to the status of the breach.

Samples of the water from the wash have been collected and submitted for testing and results are expected later today. We are closely monitoring for potential environmental and public health impacts.

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