Parks

Fire personnel from the Coconino and Kaibab National Forests are responding jointly to a lightning-caused wildfire located on the northeast side of Kendrick Peak in Kendrick Mountain Wilderness. The 300-acre Boundary Fire is currently burning on the Flagstaff Ranger District of the Coconino National Forest but is expected to move onto the Kaibab National Forest side of the boundary line within the next several days. Therefore, a joint fire organization has been established.
 

The Kaibab National Forest, in cooperation with the communities of Parks and Sherwood Forest Estates, will provide the public with access to a cinder pit on Forest Service land on specific Saturdays from May through September in order to encourage local residents to create defensible space around their homes.

Moonset Pit is located just west of the Parks community on a dirt road east of Spitz Springs on the north side of old Route 66. The pit will be open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the following Saturdays for disposal of natural, woody debris such as tree limbs and pine needles:

The Sitgreaves Complex on the Williams Ranger District near Parks, Ariz., reached its final size of 11,080 acres earlier this month, improving overall forest health, wildlife habitat and community safety in an area that hadn’t seen significant fire in close to a century.

The lightning-caused Duck Fire was discovered July 7 about 3 miles northwest of Parks, and fire managers decided to allow it to continue burning as it would naturally as long as it could be safely managed while benefiting forest resources.

The lightning-caused Sitgreaves Complex that is being managed to improve forest health on the Kaibab National Forest continued growing at a moderated pace as an increase in thunderstorms bringing higher relative humidities has diminished activity.

Yesterday’s fire activity on the Sitgreaves Complex was relegated to creeping and smoldering as cloud cover dominated the fire area. Light showers were observed over parts of the planning area. Smoke was lighter and dispersed locally.

The two fires being managed to achieve resource objectives near Tusayan, Ariz., remain active while the other managed fires on the Kaibab National Forest and the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park have slowed substantially or petered out due to rain. Much of northern Arizona has received substantial precipitation over the last few days, putting a damper on the naturally-ignited fires that were being managed to improve forest health and reduce the likelihood of future high-severity fires.

The fires being managed for resource benefit on the Kaibab National Forest and the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park are growing slowly but steadily as weather conditions vary on a daily basis. Yesterday, the fires received varying amounts of precipitation, from a heavy downpour on the Sitgreaves Complex to more light and scattered rainfall on the fires further north.

The fires being managed for resource benefit on the Kaibab National Forest and the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park increased in activity yesterday due to drier conditions. Fire managers are hopeful that the drier weather pattern will allow the fires to continue growing and achieving resource objectives such as improving forest health and reducing the likelihood of future high-severity fires.

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