Sedona

The Snake Ridge wildfire continues to burn within the fire perimeter with low to moderate intensity. Today firefighters will work to hold and secure all fire lines within the perimeter with no anticipated fire ignition.  Fire managers recognize the potential for lingering smoke and temporary impacts to outlying communities given the lack of air movement and poor ventilation.  Firefighter safety and community health continues to be fire managers’ top priority while working to secure the fire and protect values at risk, including the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) powerline. 

The Bell Trail, located along Wet Beaver Creek just east of the Sedona exit off Interstate 17, will be closed through the weekend for public safety as firefighters conduct mop-up and sawing operations due to a fire that started yesterday evening.

The human-caused Beaver Creek Fire was contained at one acre between Bell Trail and Wet Beaver Creek just north of the old Beaver Creek Ranger Station.

Interstate 17 is now open in both directions south of Flagstaff.

The closure on Friday morning was for police activity near I-17 at Newman Park Road where the Arizona Department of Public Safety safely disposed of hazardous materials that were best destroyed in place.

For the most current information about highway closures and restrictions statewide, visit ADOT’s Travel Information Site at www.az511.gov.

 

Coconino National Forest fire personnel are on scene at the Bear Fire tonight. The fire, reported near 3:30 p.m., is located northwest of Secret Mountain near the Secret Mountain Wilderness, approximately 17 miles southwest of Flagstaff.

The fire is approximately 9 acres in size.

Coconino National Forest Fire crews have the forward progress stopped and will continue clean-up and mop-up operations.

Fire managers on the Coconino National Forest are utilizing a lightning-caused wildfire, located approximately 10 miles northwest of Sedona, near Turkey Butte, to achieve multiple objectives.

The Echo Fire is burning at a low intensity, consuming dead forest branches, logs, leaves and pine needles. The fire is producing minimal smoke. However, it may become more active throughout the next week and grow in size, as it will be managed by the Forest Service to allow the fire to fulfill its natural role in the ecosystem.

In preparation for the upcoming monsoon season, the National Weather Service, Sedona Fire District, Coconino County Emergency Management and Coconino County Certified Emergency Response Team (CERT) will test the emergency siren system in Oak Creek Canyon at approximately 10 a.m. Wednesday, June 24.  

This system is designed to notify Oak Creek Canyon and Uptown Sedona residents of severe emergencies that require evacuation.

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