smoke

The Pine Hollow fire continued to grow today and is now just under 500 acres, the fire did receive moderate precipitation over the weekend and more is forecasted for tomorrow.

Tomorrow’s planned strategy is to take advantage of recent wetting conditions and blackline perimeters around sensitive areas within the 10,295 acre planning area boundary.

“We’re going to do so on our terms, when we’re not being pushed and can control the intensity of fire behavior in and around sensitive areas that we want to protect,” said Type IV Incident Commander Dave Veater.

The Burned Area Emergency Response Team (BAER) has completed a soil burn severity map of the Frye Fire.  Based on their analysis 1,917 acres received a rating of “High” burn severity, 5,318 acres were “Moderate” burn severity, and 31,447 acres received a rating of “Low” severity.  These ratings reflect the level of impact that the fire had on soil cover and vegetation and are used to project the impact on associated watersheds. 

A lightning-ignited fire was reported yesterday, July 19, 2017, in the Rincon Mountains at approximately 3:15 p.m. It is located about two miles northeast of Spud Rock. The fire is estimated to be approximately an acre.

Firefighters are currently monitoring and assessing the fire. Fire behavior is currently low, dampened by humidity and recent rain. There’s a chance of additional precipitation in the coming days. Firefighters will continue to monitor the fire and take action as needed.

Location: Safford Ranger District, Coronado National Forest

The Frye Fire Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) assessment team has completed an evaluation of the effects of the fire on watershed conditions to determine the potential risk to human life, safety, property, and critical natural and cultural resources. They have also assessed whether appropriate and effective stabilization measures can be implemented on national forest lands in a timely manner to reduce unacceptable risks from potential flooding and debris flow threats.

Within the past week, North Zone fire personnel consisting of firefighters from the U.S. Forest Service and National Park Service have responded jointly to multiple lightning-caused wildfires located on both the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and adjacent North Kaibab Ranger District of the Kaibab National Forest.

Lightning-caused wildfires are a common occurrence during the monsoon season (typically late-June through late-July). Of the five fires sparked by monsoonal storms this week, two are being suppressed and three are being monitored. 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - smoke