lightning

Coconino National Forest fire managers are utilizing forest roads as natural boundaries to back burn around a lightning-caused wildfire and eventually contain the wildfire that is located approximately five miles northeast of Munds Park.

The Spur Fire began Friday (Oct. 28) about five miles northeast of Munds Park and is currently burning in an area with heavy forest fuels.

Storms brought rain and increased humidity this week on the Pinchot Fire, making conditions unfavorable for continuing perimeter burn operations. As the storms pass and conditions dry through the weekend, burn operations are expected to resume Monday, October 3, 2016. 

On Monday (September 26), the incoming storms shifted the prevailing winds from the typical southwest pattern to northeast. This dispersed smoke from Monday's burn operations towards the towns of Pine and Strawberry.

With the warm weather experienced this past weekend, the Pinchot Fire grew to 45 acres. It has moved into the Bear Canyon area, to secure holding features, today crews are doing preparation work along Forest Roads 95 and 139A.

Smoke has been noticed within the Blue Ridge communities. Some of the smoke is from the Pinchot Fire, but most of the smoke is from the prescribed burn that the Tonto National Forest is doing along Highway 260, east of Payson.

Fire managers with the Coconino National Forest are utilizing a lightning-caused fire in the Dick Hart Ridge area southeast of Clints Well to benefit the landscape and maintain a healthy ecosystem by allowing fire to fulfill its natural role in the environment. The forest thrives on fires such as these that are low severity and creep across the forest floor.

Fire managers with the Coconino National Forest are utilizing a lightning-caused fire in the Crackerbox Canyon and Battleground Ridge area southeast of Clints Well to benefit the landscape and maintain a healthy ecosystem by allowing fire to fulfill its natural role in the environment. The forest thrives on fires such as these that are low severity and creep across the forest floor. They reduce fuels and the risk of severe wildfire, create safer conditions for residents, the public and firefighters, and also restore wildlife habitat by stimulating understory vegetation growth.

Coconino National Forest fire managers are utilizing a recent lightning-caused wildfire north of Bellemont to help maintain a healthy ecosystem by allowing fire to creep across the landscape and clear forest debris and dead wood.

The Hickok Fire began August 5 about four miles north/northwest of Bellemont and is currently 50 acres, moving primarily toward the northeast.

The Baldwin Fire is a lightning-caused fire burning about 4 to 5 miles south of Heber and Overgaard in the Rodeo-Chediski burn scar.

The Baldwin Fire is 100 percent contained.

Fire managers made the decision to confine this lightning-caused fire to accomplish multiple objectives. The fire has met all its objectives; however, smoke may be visible within the interior of the fire until completely extinguished by monsoonal rains.

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