Safety

The Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) coordinates interactive mapping for the Heat Relief Network, a collaboration of municipalities, nonprofit organizations, faith-based communities, and businesses that accept water donations or provide hydration and refuge from heat for people in need. The goal of the Heat Relief Network is to prevent heat-related deaths and illnesses.

Arizona is very dry and we are continuously having days of high winds and low humidity. We would like to ask for your help in sharing these reminders. It is up to us and our visitors to stay safe and do what we can to reduce wildfire danger.

FIREWISE REMINDERS:

Currently all Fire Districts, Arizona State Forestry, and National Forest are under Stage II restrictions.

 Stage II Fire Restrictions:

With summer temperatures at hand and the landscape extremely dry across Arizona, dragging chains, tossing cigarette butts or even having underinflated tires can start fires along state highways.

To get ready for fire season, Arizona Department of Transportation crews mow vegetation along highway shoulders in the winter and spring. They remove brush, thin trees and spray fire retardant within the ADOT right-of-way to prevent fires and slow the spread of those that occur.

“We want everyone to make it home safe,” said Governor Ducey. “Paying attention when driving through work zones will keep safe the men and women who build and maintain Arizona’s roads as well as everyone traveling through work zones.”

Being alert and paying attention to signage in work zones is especially important for motorists because national statistics show that vehicle occupants account for more than 80 percent of traffic fatalities that occur in work zones. In 2017 in Arizona, nearly 1,300 crashes occurred in work zones, resulting in 11 fatalities and 30 serious injuries.

Fire managers on the Verde Ranger District have several fuel treatments planned October 16th through November 20th; depending on current and expected weather conditions.  Tactics to keep smoke impacts as minimal as possible include canceling approved burns when conditions aren’t favorable, timing daytime ignitions to allow the majority of smoke to disperse prior to settling overnight, and burning larger sections at a time when conditions are favorable to reduce the overall number of days smoke is in the area.

With strong monsoon storms forecast in much of Arizona going into the weekend, be ready to pull aside and wait out extreme weather.

Please heed this advice: Get off the highways when facing a dust storm. In almost no time, blowing dust can drop visibility to zero, especially where small dust channels afford drivers little or no opportunity to avoid this hazard.

Other tips from the Arizona Department of Transportation:

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